HOME

About Us

Why advertise with us?

How can we help you

Contacts

Subscription packages

Anglia Ruskin University

Please visit our other conference venues sites…

Conference Venues Ashford

Conference Venues Basingstoke

Conference Venues Bath

Conference Venues Blackburn

Conference Venues Blackpool

Conference Venues Bradford

Conference Venues Brighton

Conference Venues Bristol

Conference Venues Bournemouth

Conference Venues Bury St Edmunds

Conference Venues Cambridge

Conference Venues Cardiff

Conference Venues Carlisle

Conference Venues Cheadle

Conference Venues Chelmsford

Conference Venues Cheltenham

Conference Venues Chester

Conference Venues Colchester

Conference Venues Derby













Conference Venues Eastbourne

Conference Venues Exeter

Conference Venues Folkestone

Conference Venues Gloucester

Conference Venues Hastings

Conference Venues High Wycombe

Conference Venues Ipswich

Conference Venues Kidderminster

Conference Venues Kings Lynn

Conference Venues Leeds

Conference Venues Luton

Conference Venues Maidstone

Conference Venues Middlesbrough

Conference Venues Milton Keynes

Conference Venues Nantwich

Conference Venues Newbury

Conference Venues Newcastle

Conference Venues New Forest

Conference Venues Norwich












Conference Venues Northampton

Conference Venues Nottingham

Conference Venues Oxford

Conference Venues Peterborough

Conference Venues Portsmouth

Conference Venues Plymouth

Conference Venues Reading

Conference Venues Redditch

Conference Venues Richmond

Conference Venues Salisbury

Conference Venues Shrewsbury

Conference Venues High Southampton

Conference Venues Stratford upon Avon

Conference Venues Swindon

Conference Venues Telford

Conference Venues Worcester












History of Cheadle

Cheadle is entered in the Domesday Book (1086) as "Celle" held by the lord of the manor, Robert of Stafford, at the time the area covered 6 miles by 3 miles and listed 9 families.
In 1176 the Basset family acquired the manor of "Chedle" and in 1250 Ralph Basset was granted a market charter and annual fair by King Henry III (750 years this year 2000).
In 1309, 75 families are recorded as using a corn-grinding mill sited near Mill Road.
In 1350 a new church was built replacing a 12th-century structure and this church remained in use until 1837.
In 1606 a school was founded by the church, and in 1685 the then curate of the parish (Rev, Henry Stubbs) left an endowment to "found" a grammar school in Cheadle. The school was built at Monkhouse and was active until 1917. The endowment continues to this day.
In 1676 Cheadle’s population is recorded as just over one thousand, and a hundred years later (1772) as one thousand eight hundred. At this time the main source of employment was agriculture and farming.
1775 : A new workhouse was built and opened. It was extended under the Cheadle Union an 1837. Part of the original building was demolished in 1909, renamed an Infirmary. The whole complex was demolished in 1987 and a new hospital was built on the site, which was opened on the 26th June 1989 by The Princess Royal.
In 1798, 10 weavers houses were built. The weavers lived downstairs and the looms for the manufacture of tape were upstairs. By the 1820’s the looms were transferred into a factory in Tape Street. This tape factory closed in 1972, and now forms a part of the "B&M Store".


In 1851 silk and narrow fabric mills were built in Cheadle (by Arnolds) and these employed hundreds of operatives in their day, to be closed down in 1981. Between 1875 - 78 William Morris, founder of the Arts and Crafts Movement, made frequent visits to the silk works in Cheadle to experiment with organic dyes. Many of Cheadle's silk products featured Morris's designs.